NHS Scotland Staff Experience and Continuous Improvement Model: Research into Implementation

This research evaluates the implementation and impact of iMatter – the staff engagement model for the NHS in Scotland.

Staff engagement is central to Scottish Government’s responsibility to monitor NHS Staff Governance Standards. Such engagement can support improved NHS patient/client care outcomes and is an integral part of partnership working in NHS Scotland. Staff engagement practices represent one important element of employee voice (a core element of the Fair Work Framework), with the potential to support innovation and change at every level from immediate teams to Health Boards and the wider NHS by harnessing views, opinions and behaviours that contribute to continuous improvements in practice.

This project will gather the insights of staff and managers on iMatter’s contribution to supporting staff engagement and continuous improvement, informing the future development of practice in this area.

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Review of Partnership Working in NHS Scotland

Findlay, P., Lindsay, C. and Stewart, R. (2019) “Review of Partnership Working in NHS Scotland”

This review was commissioned by The Scottish Government Workforce Practice Unit and Health and Social Care Analysis Division in conjunction with the Scottish Partnership Forum. Its key aim is to provide insight to maximise the impact of partnership working on the delivery of the Health and Social Care Delivery Plan1 (HSCDP) by reflecting on the adequacy of existing arrangements and their fitness for purpose in the context of the changing health and social care landscape. This requires a robust assessment of:

  • whether current arrangements deliver on desired objectives at every level; involve the right people in the right roles; demonstrate the values and behaviours expected within NHS Scotland; and represent best practice in industrial relations;
  • whether current arrangements are sufficient to deliver the pace of change in contemporary health and social care; and
  • whether current arrangements are capable of being adapted to reflect new and emerging structures within an integrated health and social care landscape.

Partnership arrangements in NHS Scotland have been in operation since 1999 and have been described as “…probably the most ambitious and important contemporary innovation in British public sector industrial relations”i. Below we briefly discuss the concept of workplace partnership, and its relevance to broader debates on collaborative governance in public services; review the literature on the impact of partnership in healthcare and the specific context of NHS Scotland; and finally connect to the broader Scottish policy agenda on fair work, inclusive growth and public service innovation and reform.

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Influencing employers so more people break free from poverty through work

Findlay, P., Lindsay, C., Watson, A. and Young, D

We all want to live in a society where work provides a reliable route out of poverty, but currently one in eight UK workers are trapped in poverty: that’s just over 4 million people being held back. Employers have a role to play in solving in-work poverty, as a vital part of other systemic changes. This research from Strathclyde Business School explores the responses of employers to in-work poverty, and recommends ways that businesses might – and might be influenced to – make work a better route out of poverty.

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Workplace Innovation in Small to Medium Sized Enterprises in Scotland

Findlay, P., Chalmers, D., Lindsay, C., MacBryde, J., Matthews, R., Pascoe-Deslauriers, R., and Wilson, J. (2015) "Innovating Works… improving work & workplaces: workplace innovation in small to medium sized enterprises in Scotland", University of Strathclyde, Glasgow.

This report draws lessons from international and national research and practice to define Workplace Innovation and showcase examples from Scottish Small to Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs) from the Innovating Works… pilot study. It identifies lessons and challenges in Workplace Innovation and provides an overview of Workplace Innovation in practice in a selection of the SMEs case study companies, including: AgriCo.*, Glenammer Engineering Ltd., GMG Contractors Ltd., MAKLab, Greenhill, Swipii, Romanes Pharmacy, HealthCo. and William Purves Funeral Directors Ltd.

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Harnessing knowledge, research and networks to drive fair, innovative and transformative work in Scotland

Findlay, P., Lindsay, C., McQuarrie, J., Pascoe-Deslauriers, R., with Findlay, J., Smart, A. and Chalmers, D. (2016) "Harnessing knowledge, research and networks to drive fair, innovative and transformative work in Scotland - Fair, Innovative and Transformative Work (FITwork) Project Year 1 Report: Parts 1 and 2", University of Strathclyde, Glasgow.

This document reports on Years 1 of the FITwork project. Part 1 reviews the policy and economic context and evidence base for our work, describes how we have operationalised FITwork through a conceptual framework and diagnostic tool, and highlights potential benefits for employees, employers and the broader policy agenda around inclusive growth. In Part 2, we examine how issues related to fair work, workplace innovation and innovation policy have been presented and debated by policymakers and stakeholder organisations, including employer representative organisations, civil society organisations and trade unions, over the last decade. Our main focus is on current stakeholder views on the broader FITwork terrain, and to the challenges facing stakeholders, particularly in relation to the challenges of building collaborative activity that might support and deepen FITwork.

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Exploring the evidence: Opportunities for fair, innovative and transformative work in Scotland

The FITwork Project: Research Briefings 1 and 2 offer evidence and learning from Year 1 of the project: Harnessing Knowledge, Research and Networks to Drive Fair, Innovative and Transformative Work (FITwork) in Scotland.

In this briefing, we outline some of the evidence and thinking that has informed the policy and research agenda around fair, innovative and transformative work, highlighting the scope to generate transformative outcomes for individuals, employers and Scottish society. Building on this, we also present the FITwork Tool as a means of exploring workplace practice.

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Developing the Young Workforce (DYW)

Understanding the skills opportunity for today & tomorrow in Glasgow

Developing the Young Workforce (DYW) is a seven-year programme that aims to better prepare young people for the world of work.

To help inform the delivery of this initiative in Glasgow, this report reviews the current skills landscape in the city and the demand from Glasgow’s business base both now and in the future.

The report has been prepared by the Fraser of Allander Institute and the Scottish Centre for Employment Research, based at the University of Strathclyde.

For the purposes of this project, we undertook two complimentary strands of work. Firstly, we reviewed the evidence on the Glasgow economy and the provision of skills. However, we are conscious that a purely analytical and statistical exercise can only go so far.

Therefore, alongside this analysis, we embarked upon a series of evidence gathering sessions with employers, skills and employability service providers and young people themselves to learn at first-hand about their experiences of the employment and skills landscape.

This report is the final summary of these activities.

It is structured as follows.

We begin with a discussion of the overarching economic context in which the Glasgow labour market finds itself in, before looking at skills demand in Glasgow and likely future trends.

We then focus upon the supply of skills before concluding with a discussion around how best to match skills demand with supply.

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Networks and collaboration: Driving fair, innovative and transformative work in Scotland

The FITwork Project: Research Briefings 1 and 2 offer evidence and learning from Year 1 of the project: Harnessing Knowledge, Research and Networks to Drive Fair, Innovative and Transformative Work (FITwork) in Scotland.

In Briefing 1, we outlined the evidence suggesting that fair work and workplace innovation can generate transformative outcomes for individuals, businesses and other employers and for Scotland, and presented the FITwork Tool as a means of exploring workplace practice.

This briefing examines how researchers, policy makers, employers, trade unions, civil society organisations and other stakeholders in Scotland have engaged with debates on fair work and workplace innovation (for brevity, FITwork) over the last decade, and considers the challenges – and opportunities – of building collaborative activity and networks that can further support and deepen FITwork.

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